I’m not saying it’s aliens but…

reptilian

Reptilians.

One of our hot topics for debate here at the 33rd Parallel is reptilians. Do they exist? And if so, what are they? Where do they come from and what do they want?

The concept of our reptilian overlords was popularized by conspiracy guru David Icke, possibly to discredit himself in the eyes of certain powers that might have him assassinated if he sounded sane.  But the idea of reptilian humanoids has a lineage stretching back through the popular men’s fantasy fiction of the 1930’s, Helena Blavatsky’s Dragon Men of Lemuria, and even farther. Even the name Dracula comes from the word “dragon”, and was the name of an order that Vladamir Tepes was granted in the 1400’s for his ferocity.

So what’s the story here?

Possibility 1: The Common Sense Explanation

Some of us here at the 33rd HQ believe that reptilians are a metaphor for the R-complex, the part of the brain which controls our basic survival and base pleasure instincts. Fighting, fleeing, fucking and freezing are all governed by our reptile brain, so called because it is the most primitive part of our brain structure, with the limbic system (mammal brain) and neocortex (human brain) building on its underlying architecture.

According to this theory, “reptilians” are a metaphor that can be projected onto people or groups whose behavior seems cold blooded or alien. This process of projecting unconsciously held metaphors has been observed in specific populations.

According to this article by Jon Ronson, chief propagator of the reptilian conspiracy David Icke might be using “reptilian” as a coded metaphor for the Jewish banking conspiracy. Icke himself seems pretty clear that he means literal twelve foot tall lizard people though.

As fun as it might be to speculate about the mental state of folks who spread this kind of belief, there are other possibilities as well. So now that Occam’s Razor is out of the way, let’s look at some juicier possibilities.

Possibility 2: It’s really Aliens

In his 1976 book The Sirius Mystery, Robert G. Temple speculates that the Dogon people from Mali had communication with “fish people” from the Sirius star system and that those aliens gave us human culture. It is pretty much accepted now that that was just bad anthropology and projection on his part, but that hasn’t stopped the believers from believing.

Digging around on the internet for actual primary source accounts of encounters with reptilians tends to yield a lot of sloppy, low quality “reporting” and cases of hypnotically recovered memories. The strongest case for the existence of the literal existence of these cold-blooded aliens seems to be comparative mythology, which some of us at 33 HQ think makes a stronger case that they are more metaphorical than literal.

In fact, here is some “proof” that David Icke is right, which basically says what we already talked about up there.

Possibility 3: It’s Angels (or Demons or extra-dimensional entities or whatever)

David Icke’s interest in the reptilians seems to have been sparked by his discovery of alleged MKULTRA mind control victim Arizona Wilder, who talked about encountering the reptilians in the context of occult ritual, under extreme psychological duress. According to this thread on a conspiracy forum, she has subsequently recanted.

Here is a story about someone following in the footsteps of 33rd parallel perennial favorite Aleister Crowley and contacting the intelligence known as Lam. It’s worth noting that he describes the uhhh… alien(?) as being “a very cold, mechanical kind of computer-like intelligence”.

Is it possible that these so-called alien intelligences are reaching out to us from an invisible dimension throughout collective imagination? Are they influencing our thoughts and evolution? If so, we might expect to find very little literal evidence, but the case could be made…

Is someone (or something) tinkering with our memory?

 

Screen Shot 2017-04-03 at 5.20.12 PMRemember the pralines!

If you’re like most people, you don’t think about memory much at all. If you were to think of memory you might think of it working like a computer. You have an experience. The experience gets encoded and uploaded into your brain. Later you can retrieve it, or it can come back to you automatically, like Proust traveling back in time when he smelled that praline.

The fact is that science doesn’t know exactly how memory works. There is even debate about how malleable it is. Memory seems to play a key role in developing and maintaining social relationships, which are, in turn, essential to maintaining mental and physical health. Memory can be distributed between couples, within families, and throughout a larger culture.  In fact, as that last link shows, memories can be altered through social contagion, like when your mom tells you that that story you’ve been telling about that weird thing you did that one summer vacation actually belongs to your sibling, or when a whole group misremembers something. One thing we do know is that memory is falsifiable to an alarming degree.

OK, 33rd, I imagine hearing you say, that’s funny and everything, but where is the conspiracy in this? Well, you, I answer, I’m glad you asked.

Remember the Berenstain Bears syndrome, later named the Mandela effect? And how it has been debunked? One of our favorite topics here at 33 HQ is The Plot to Disrupt the Collective Consciousness (by agency or agencies unknown). I’m going to make the case that you, dear citizen, have been Operation Mindfucked.

Do you remember thinking how weird the “What color is the dress?” debate was? Like why is this even a thing? And then there was the popularization of the term “gaslighting“. But, you continue, dafuq do gaslighting, memory falsification, the Mandela effect and the color of that tacky ass dress have to do with each other?

Apophenia, Engage!

Gaslighting is a form of manipulation that seeks to sow seeds of doubt in a targeted individual or members of a group, hoping to make targets question their own memory, perception, and sanity. Using persistent denial, misdirection, contradiction, and lying, it attempts to destabilize the target and delegitimize the target’s belief.”
-Wikipedia
April 3, 2017

Around the water cooler in the 33 P office suite, we had long speculated on what possible benefit undermining people’s confidence in their own judgment might have if we were a sinister organization concerned only with power for power’s sake. And then, while researching the occult roots of Scientology we turned up this paper by the Godfather of hypnosis (and primary progenitor of NLP), Milton H. Erickson, MD.

In case you can’t be bothered to click on the links, I’ll paste the most relevant bit below, but first I am going to berate you for taking our word for anything. You should definitely realize that we are recklessly irresponsible in our storytelling and probably just a tad bit paranoid as hell. Still, suit yourself. Here is what the good doctor said about his famous confusion technique:

“In essence, it is no more than a presentation of a whole series of individually differing, contradictory suggestions, apparently all at variance with each other, differently directed, and requiring a constant shift in orientation by the subject…one may systematically build up a state of confusion …, until a retreat from the confusion by a complete acceptance of the suggestions of the moment becomes a greatly desired goal.”

It’s worth noting that the word here is “suggestions”, not “commands”. When they just tell us what to do, it’s easy for us to say some variation of “No, fuck off,” depending on the power dynamic. I might have more success if I was less direct and you were less wary. For example, if I were to tell you “buy a Coke,” you might agree, but if you disagree I am stuck with a power struggle and most likely no sale. I’ll have a better chance of selling you something if I say “would you prefer a Coke or a Pepsi?” in which case the suggestion is that you would like something to drink and that you will prefer one of the options over the other. Oversimplification is radically oversimplified but illustrative.

The Conspiracy

So here’s the conclusion we’ve come up with, based on pure paranoid guess work:

There is at least one invisible power which launched a concerted memetic attack on the collective consciousness of the English-speaking world, in order to radically disrupt culture and replace it with a more (unconsciously) obedient one.

Towards what ends, we can only speculate…

More on false memories in the pod.

 

 

 

 

 

 

The Jackson Pollock Mind Control Conspiracy

 

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As always with this stuff, it’s a good idea to bear in mind the credibility of the source, which, since this is coming to you hot from 33 HQ, is pretty questionable. That being said, a couple of pieces of information have come to our attention which we speculate about on the new 33 P podcast.

Here we’re just going to lay out the “facts” and let you be the judge.

Jackson Pollock was one of the most influential artists of the twentieth century. That his drip paintings had a huge impact on the art world is undeniable. Pollock’s splatter paintings show a unique fractal geometry, even though Fractals were first named in 1975, nearly two decades after Pollock’s untimely death in 1956.

At the height of the cold war between the United States and Russia, the CIA covertly promoted abstract impressionism, and Pollock in particular, as representative of the American ideals of freedom and self-expression, a jab aimed at psychologically destabilizing the repressive Soviet regime.  So the story goes.

It’s well known that the CIA conducted experiments on the American civilian population and developed a variety of subtle and/or hideous techniques for gaining and maintaining compliance in individuals and populations.

It is our assertion that the CIA was well ahead of the curve in terms of applied psychological manipulation and that they may have been aware of some of the effects that the art work they were unleashing on an unsuspecting populace. It is clear that the effect of the emergence of the abstract impressionist movement was disruptive to the art market. Is it possible that they were aware of a subliminal influence in Pollock’s art, and that they were out to destabilize more than just the art market and the Soviet State?

Sure. Anything is possible…on the 33rd Parallel.

Click the catch copy below for the podcast.

 

Can witchcraft stop a world leader?

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It has come to our attention here at 33P that there is a rumor of a ritual to bind Donald Trump going around.

This got us wondering to what extent this could influence things. Obviously, magick isn’t rocket science, so we can only speculate based on precedent.  Does such precedent exist? Well, if you believe Gerald Gardener, the guy who brought us modern Wicca, yes it does.

According to Gardner, a group of English witches got together in 1940 and threw a bunch of mumbo-jumbo at Hitler.

Hardly conclusive, but every bit counts.

In the ancient world, competing gods were often evoked by both sides before a battle. The old testament is full of stories about gods being defeated by the superior magick of the people whose history was being told. Here’s a list of ways more modern folks have evoked the power of the occult in warfare.

Still more recently the 4channers (accidental/emergent) evocation of the “god” Kek is the stuff of internet legend.

In the ritualized mock combat we call sports it’s fairly common to pray before a match, with some teams going farther and evoking actual magick, with the Rwandan Soccer Federation going so far as to ban witchcraft because of some weird shit.

As modern rational people, we can’t help but recognize that magick is just a bunch of superstitious nonsense, right? But still, even if it’s just a strong nocebo we think it’s still worth a shot.

The Tao of Eschatology

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Remember that time that fungus head philosopher received revelation from the plant kingdom and used state of the art technology, the i-ching,  and the Mayan calendar to predict the eschaton? It was a simpler time when the BerenstEin bears were proudly displayed in bookstores, We Are The Champions ended with “of the world”,  and Han Solo shot first…  Oh. And the Revelation of the Great Day of God the Almighty hadn’t really kicked off yet. Those were the days.

“The Eschaton has a date: December 21, 2012.”

I’m pretty comfortable believing that that happened and the world actually did end. For a few reasons.

I’m pretty sure we’re in a different timeline now. One where the singularity has already happened, and the internet is the Messiah in its infancy.

But that’s just me. Other people have different ideas.

For people who subscribe to a more Abrahamic worldview, the One True God will come back to earth in a great revelation, followed by a messianic age of brotherhood, peace, and prosperity for all of the survivors.

This idea seems to have led some people to the conclusion that it’s a good idea to “immanentize the eschaton“, an idea co-opted and promoted by some Discordians in the 1970’s. Sometimes satire can be a dangerous thing. Like when you tell someone “Don’t get angry but…” Of course they’re going to get angry. Of course. You’ve totally primed them to do exactly what you don’t want. Similarly, if you tell them “Here’s a dystopian future we don’t want. We absolutely do not want this horrible world. Compelling, isn’t it?” We can’t help but drive towards whatever we are most focus on. And generations of cultural catastrophizing have brought us to this point in history, where a lot of folks seem to think the end of the world is upon us.

Now some of those people seem to be sewing the seeds of chaos while they prepare for the fallout.

I don’t know about you, but I can catastrophize pretty good. When things start looking bleak, it’s very easy for me to generate all the scenarios about how much worse it’s going to get. And then I can start telling myself stories about how horrible it all is, how inadequate to the situation I am, how nothing can be done and how much it was all shit anyway. And then I can just give up and shut down. Not because of what is happening, but because of the phantom mindstuff that I’m making up and then empowering.

So what’s to be done?

According to research, being mindful of what is really happening in and around you throughout the course of your day can have many benefits on your health and mental well-being, including better clarity, decision making and reaction time.

I studied a martial art under a Buddhist monk briefly. During that time, one of the many things he demonstrated that made a lot of sense to me was that there are two kinds of things, things that you can affect and things that you can’t. When you can, it is beneficial to be fully present and engaged, and when you can’t do anything, it is better to do nothing.

If there is, in fact,  a war on consciousness happening, the way to win is to not be moved.

So here’s what I’d rather see myself doing: breathe, ground yourself, be gently aware, let go of what you can’t affect and do what you can.

We’re curious to learn if you have any strategies you find particulary useful for keeping yourself focused and responsive when things look bleak. Please feel free to share! We’re always happy to develop better resources.

 

Are Corporations Demonic Egregores?

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Like other living organisms, corporations strive to survive. They require energy in the form of money, labor, and other resources in order to sustain themselves. Unless they receive a fresh and constant flow of energy they tend to stagnate, diminish and die off. Of course, they have no material bodies of their own and must still rely on humans to maintain them, to feed them, to be their physical circulatory system and to host them within their minds.

So how does a disincarnate entity like a corporation get humans to feed it with their energy?

Similar to the way an angler fish has evolved a dangling light to attract prey, the corporation has evolved branding to capture the attention and activate the imagination of you, the consumer.

Corporations hack into the human psyche via the basic human operating system: symbols, in the form of brand names, logos, image, and story.

It runs deeper than simple hunting and consuming. A successful corporation is one that can maintain and milk its target. They have evolved a variety of strategies for doing this. By being the only provider filling a “need” (real or manufactured)  when they can, providing the illusion of choice when they can’t, becoming associated with the premium version of a thing, or the affordable alternative to the premium version, and so on.

Modern humans have evolved an unconscious symbiotic relationship with the brands that populate our mental lives, in which they provide for our needs, and we use our life energy to gather and provide them with the resources they need to survive in our meme pool.

So are corporations demonic egregores? They certainly have a unique place in modern human culture.

We’re curious to learn your thoughts.

Stay tuned for the 33rd Parallel podcast All About the Demons, where we figure out once and for all what exactly demons are.